Oedipus the King Essay

Oedipus the King Essay

Alan Goda, Jr. English 10 Honors– second 11/9/12 Oedipus the King Essay Sight and Blindness has several significances throughout the world. The concept of loss of sight can be viewed as the literal inability to take a look at the world and it is also viewed as being blind to a situation or event that is apparent. The Sophocles Tragedy, Oedipus the King, depicts both of the viewpoints of sight and loss of sight. The characters in Sophocles’ work live a busy, ever-changing, life with twists of fate. Oedipus initially reveals the indirect side of blindness regarding being oblivious.

Oedipus reveals this depiction of blindness through what he states when he speaks to Jocasta about the possible misfortunate events in his life. Oedipus says, in an all-knowing tone, to Jocasta, “You have nothing to be scared of. Even if my mom ends up being a servant, and I a slave for 3 generations back, your noble birth will not be called in concern.” Despite the fact that Oedipus truly believes that he understands whatever, even more than the gods and the oracles, he truly is in a state of total oblivion regarding whether Jocasta is his genuine mom. Oedipus’ oblivion results in an abrupt awareness that sends his world spiraling.

In the later part of the play, Oedipus shows the literal side of the subject of sight, or loss of sight. Oedipus’ descriptive, comprehensive, words, while stabbing his eyes, reveal the really horrifying way that literal blindness is gotten in touch with this book. The messenger says, restating Oedipus’ discussion and actions, “He removed the golden pins with which her clothing were fastened, raised them high above his head, and speared the students of his eyes. “You will not see,” he said, “the scaries I have actually suffered and done. Be dark permanently now-eyes that saw those you should never ever have seen, and stopped working to acknowledge those you longed to see. Murmuring words like these he raised his hands and struck his eyes once again, and once again. And each time the wounded eyes sent out a stream of blood down his chin, no oozing circulation but a dark shower of it, thick as a hailstorm.” In this comprehensive description, Oedipus acts out in sheer pity and disgust for him and his wrong-doings. He thinks that everything is no longer worth seeing which seeing things would be just too painful. Oedipus requests Creon, the now king, to exile him to a place where no male can see him or talk to him. He informs Creon that he need to be left to pass away on Mount Cithaeron, where he was nce left to die, where he was expected to die. The abrupt realization of his unholy life leads Oedipus to, ultimately, the foreshadowing of his death. A connection has been made in between sight and loss of sight and Oedipus the King through the character’s actions. Oedipus exhibits this theory in examples of oblivion and actual blindness throughout a 24 hour period of his life that went so terribly wrong. Within such a brief amount of time Oedipus’ life went from the absolute greatest and happiest point to absolute disgust and the need for self-destruction.

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