Holden in Catcher in the Rye

Holden in Catcher in the Rye

Maturing poses obstacles to most people by leaving the innocence of youth, to face the maturity of dealing with the their adult years. The character Holden Caulfield from, “The Catcher in The Rye, by J.D Salinger, discovers that he wants to safeguard kids, however understands he needs to mature. He wishes to secure kids from the vulgar world. Nevertheless, he is struggling since he would choose to remain innocent, instead of handling phoniness. He finds out that all kids require to mature.
Holden has the need to secure kids from losing their innocence, since he believes that the world he lives in is filled with phonies. He states, “I kept imagining all these little kids playing some video game in this huge field of rye. Countless little kids and nobody’s around-except me. I’m standing on the edge of some insane cliff. What I have to do, I need to catch everybody if they begin to go over the cliff,” (Pg. 173). He also discusses that it is not only kids who he wishes to safeguard, however likewise Jane Gallagher. Holden’s relationship with her is innocent, which shows his issue. She is the significance of purity. Holden wishes to protect her from Stradlater, avoiding them from messing around. As a result, Holden’s wish to secure innocence shows just how much he wants to maintain innocence, even though he needs to develop.
Not just does he need to develop, but he likewise battles with maturity also. He wants that he might fit in with the adult world by revealing that he is fully grown. For example, when Holden goes to the Lavender Space in chapter 10, he pretends to be of legal age by buying a scotch and soda. Obviously, he gets captured in the act, and ends up ordering simply a soda. Likewise, in chapter 14, after relieving Holden of his funds, Maurice physically assaults him. “Then he smacked meal I felt was this terrific punch in my stomach,” (Pg. 103). In essence, he shows Holden what sort of person he does not wish to be. Regardless of Maurice’s action, he represents an extremely important modification in Holden that reveals his struggles to develop. As much as Holden tries to reside in the adult world, he knows that he will eventually need to deal with living in the adult world, even if it is tough for him.
As a result, Holden progresses toward completion of the novel, understanding that individuals have to grow in order to mature. He incorporates the truth that he has to let kids make their own errors, even if they fall. Especially when Holden discovers the acceptance of Phoebe’s requirement to, “get for the gold ring,” in chapter 25. This shows that he sees her as a growing individual, who should be allowed to live her own life, and take her own threats. At this point, he finally sees that kids need to do this, and grownups need to let them. Holden likewise mentions, “I sort of miss everyone I told you about. Even old Stradlater and Ackley for example. I think I even miss that goddam Maurice,” (Pg. 214). The fact that he misses out on individuals he spoke about throughout the novel, shows his advancement of maturity. He recognizes that he has to accept the flaws of others, and simply be fully grown about it since that is the way individuals are. For better or even worse, Holden’s own maturity has actually begun. He seems ready to give up to the inevitability of maturing, and moving into the adult world.
Holden’s awareness and approval of growing, up stops him from being a catcher in the rye. He sees that there can be obstacles when needing to forget about the innocence of childhood. Nevertheless, kids need to learn from their errors. This reveals Holden how to develop, in order to face the adult world, even when handling phoniness.

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