A Good Man is Hard to Find Author’s Background

The granny recognizes herself as a southern girl based on look, cash, and background. She is the primary character in this short story and also the only character that the narrator in fact shows into the mind of. The grandmother is the reason for the title of this story because she duplicates throughout the story about a “great man”, when there truly is no great male in this entire story. The grandma likewise is used in lots of methods to foreshadow the upcoming occasions in the story; such as “In case of an accident, anybody seeing her dead on the highway would know at the same time that she was a woman” (O’Connor 354)

The grandma is identified by look because she compares the way she is dressed to the way the mom is dressed.

The mom is told to be worn “slacks and still had her green kerchief” and the grandmother describes herself as having “on a navy blue straw sailor hat with a bunch of white violets on the brim and a navy blue dress with a little white dot in the print” (O’Connor 354). She wanted to make certain that “anyone seeing her dead on the highway would know at the same time that she was a lady” (O’Connor 354).

Cash is something essential to the grandma that we can also identify her by. The granny thought extremely highly of Mr. Teagarden since she states that June Star “would have succeeded to marry Mr. Teagarden since he was a gentleman and had actually bought Coca-Cola stock when it initially came out and that he had actually passed away only a few years back, an extremely rich male” (O’Connor 355). Red Sam is a “great male” in the grandma’s eyes, which is probably due to the fact that he is a rich owner of his own store (O’Connor 356).

Where the granny is from and how she is raised is likewise a big part in identifying her. In the start of the story, the grandma explains how she wishes to go to Tennessee for their trip rather of Georgia. When John Wesley says something about it, the granny gets protective over where she grew up, she states to him “I would not discuss my native nation that method” (O’Connor 354). Later in the story, the mother goes to a jukebox and plays “The Tennessee Waltz” sort of simply to rub it in to the granny that they were not, in truth, going to Tennessee. Another time in the story, the grandmother says that she recognizes where they were while en route to Georgia. But it turns out, she was simply recalling when she was in Tennessee “when she was a young lady” (O’Connor 357).

Flannery O’Connor is such an excellent author, and that reveals particularly in this piece. She determines the granny through look, money, and background. Appearance, such as the way she compares herself to the mother, how she talks about how Mr. Teagarden was “very-good looking”, and discussing the Misfit’s crew and their clothing.

Detail
I. Intro:

The grandma identifies herself as a southern girl based upon look, cash, and background. She is the main character in this short story and likewise the only character that the storyteller in fact shows into the mind of. The granny is the reason for the title of this story since she repeats throughout the story about a “excellent guy”, when there actually is no great man in this whole story. The grandma likewise is utilized in numerous methods to foreshadow the upcoming events in the story; such as “In case of a mishap, anyone seeing her dead on the highway would understand at once that she was a woman.”

II. Appearance:

The grandmother is identified by appearance in that she compares the method she is dressed to the method the mother is dressed. The mother is informed to be worn “slacks and still had her green kerchief” and the granny explains herself as having “on a navy blue straw sailor hat with a lot of white violets on the brim and a navy blue dress with a small white dot in the print.” She wished to make sure that “anyone seeing her dead on the highway would know simultaneously that she was a woman.”

III. Cash:

Cash is something crucial to the grandmother that we can also determine her by. The grandma thought very highly of Mr. Teagarden due to the fact that she states that June Star “would have succeeded to wed Mr. Teagarden due to the fact that he was a gentleman and had actually bought Coca-Cola stock when it initially came out and that he had died just a few years back, an extremely wealthy man.” Red Sam is a “excellent man” in the grandmother’s eyes, which is probably due to the fact that he is a wealthy owner of his own shop.

IV. Background:

Where the grandmother is from and how she is raised is also a big part in identifying her. In the start of the story, the grandmother explains how she wishes to go to Tennessee for their vacation instead of Georgia. When John Wesley says something about it, the granny gets protective over where she matured, she states to him “I would not talk about my native country that method.” Later on in the story, the mother goes to a jukebox and plays “The Tennessee Waltz” sort of just to rub it in to the grandma that they were not, in fact, going to Tennessee. Another time in the story, the grandmother states that she acknowledges where they were while en route to Georgia. However it ends up, she was just remembering when she was in Tennessee “when she was a girl.”

V. Conclusion:

Flannery O’Connor is such a great author, and that shows especially in this piece. She recognizes the granny through look, money, and background.

Works Cited:
O’Connor, Flannery. “An Excellent Guy is Tough to Discover.” Backpack Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing. X.J. Kennedy and Gioias eds. Pearson: New York City, 2012. 352-365. Print.

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